Senate passes measure to create special education ombud

 

STATE HOUSE – The Senate today approved legislation sponsored by Sen. Melissa A. Murray to help families of special education students navigate challenges in getting their student’s educational needs met at school.

The bill (2023-S 0063) creates an ombud office for special education, independent of the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, to ensure school districts throughout the state meet the standards required to comply with individualized education programs for students with disabilities.

The office would provide parents and teachers a place to bring up their concerns when they believe their child is not being provided the special education services to which they are entitled.

“Every child in need of special education is unique. For families, navigating the education system can be frustrating and challenging. There are often many questions about what educational services are available and what a district is required to provide. Having a Special Education Ombud would provide families, students and teachers a valuable, well-informed resource that can work to ensure children are getting the services to which they are entitled and which they deserve,” said Senator Murray (D-Dist. 24, Woonsocket, North Smithfield).

The office is modeled after the Office of the Child Advocate, which was created to collect data and investigate after injuries and deaths of children in Department of Children, Youth and Families care.

The office would also collect data about possible violations and would have investigative powers for both districts and state Department of Education. 

The legislation now goes to the House of Representatives, where Rep. Lauren Carson (D-Dist. 75, Newport) is sponsoring similar legislation (2023-H 5166).

The Senate bill is cosponsored by Sen. Louis P. DiPalma  (D-Dist. 12, Middletown, Newport, Little Compton, Tiverton), Sen. Bridget Valverde (D-Dist. 35, North Kingstown, East Greenwich, South Kingstown), Sen. Pamela J. Lauria (D-Dist. 32, Barrington, Bristol, East Providence), Sen. Ana B. Quezada (D-Dist. 2, Providence), Sen. Samuel W. Bell (D-Dist. 5, Providence), Sen. Walter S. Felag Jr. (D-Dist. 10, Warren, Bristol, Tiverton), Sen. Mark P. McKenney (D-Dist. 30, Warwick), Sen. Alana M. DiMario (D-Dist. 36, Narragansett, North Kingstown, New Shoreham) and Sen. Victoria Gu (D-Dist. 38, Charlestown, Westerly, South Kingstown).

 

 

 

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