FBI agent Peter Strzok [[ struck ]] is being criticized for exchanging anti-Trump texts with his girlfriend during the presidential campaign in 2016. In a tweet today, Trump accused former FBI Director James Comey [[ COE-me ]] of giving Strzok his "marching orders." Strzok served as Special Counsel Robert Mueller's [[ MULL-er ]] lead agent on the Russia probe until last July.        Attorney General Jeff Sessions says parents are putting their kids at risk by trying to smuggle them into the United States. At a law enforcement summit in New Orleans today, Sessions insisted the Trump administration doesn't want to separate migrant children from their parents when crossing the border. Sessions argued that the kids are getting good care.        The FBI's handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation is the hot topic on Capitol Hill today. FBI Director Christopher Wray and Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz are testifying in a Senate hearing today and a House hearing tomorrow. After an 18-month investigation, Horowitz accused the FBI and the Justice Department of mishandling the Clinton probe.        At least five people are dead following a high speed chase involving Border Patrol agents in South Texas. The SUV that was fleeing Border Patrol agents was going about 100 miles-per-hour when a Dimmitt County Sheriff's deputy took over the chase near Big Wells, southwest of San Antonio. It ended up flipping and 12 of the 14 people riding in the vehicle were ejected from it. Authorities say the driver and one passenger are U.S. citizens, but 12 others were illegal immigrants.       Heather Locklear is in the hospital undergoing a psychological evaluation after reportedly trying to kill herself. TMZ reports the actress was taken to the hospital yesterday afternoon after a family member says she was trying to find a gun to shoot herself. This comes following Locklear's arrest earlier this year, where she allegedly attacked her boyfriend and then threatened to shoot responding officers if they ever came back to her home.        The websites of tobacco companies now have to have court-ordered warnings about the health effects of nicotine and smoking. The warnings are officially called "corrective statements" and are required to address some topics that include second-hand smoke and the enhanced delivery of nicotine. The statements were ordered as part of a 2006 federal court decision that found major cigarette manufacturers defrauded the public about the health risks of tobacco products.