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For Immediate Release               Press Contact: Sarah Carr | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | (401) 769-9675

   

What: The Museum of Work & Culture’s 2018 Cinema Saturdays

When: March 3, 10, 17 at 1:30pm

Where: The Museum of Work & Culture, 42 S. Main St., Woonsocket, R.I.

French-Language Film Series at the Museum of Work & Culture in March

 

(WOONSOCKET, R.I.) – Beginning Saturday, March 3, the Museum of Work & Culture will host Cinema Saturdays, a weekly presentation of a French-language film produced in Québec. All films will be screened at 1:30pm and are subtitled in English. The films are included with the price of museum admission, purchased at the door ($8/adults, $6/students and seniors, free/children under 10).

 

The series will kick off with Paul à Québec. Paul, an aspiring artist, accompanies his wife Lucie and their daughter to celebrate Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day at Lucie's parents' home. When Paul notes the declining health of Roland, the bleeding-heart but gruff patriarch, the artist is inspired to make Roland the subject of his first comic strip.

 

Cinema Saturdays is presented as part of the MoWC’s celebration of Francophonie, a monthlong celebration of French language and culture in New England. It is made possible with the support of the Québec Delegation in Boston.

 

Other Cinema Saturdays will include:

 

March 10, Roger D’Astous: This documentary film embarks on a journey throughout the exceptional projects of Roger D'Astous, one of the most important Canadian architects of the 20th century. A student of Frank Lloyd Wright, he worked all his life to create a nordic architecture. Once a starchitect of the Sixties, this flamboyant artist then fell from grace before rising again at the dawn of the century.

 

March 17, Les Loups: In Les Loups, Elie, a young woman from the city, comes to a remote North Atlantic island to convalesce and get to know the community. The annual seal hunt is in full swing, and Elie feels both drawn to and repelled by the men engaged in it. Elie's presence arouses curiosity and mistrust. Maria, the village matriarch and den mother, seeks to uncover the secret reason behind Elie's visit.

 

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About the Museum of Work & Culture

The interactive and educational Museum of Work & Culture shares the stories of the men, women, and children who came to find a better life in Rhode Island’s mill towns in the late 19th- and 20th centuries. It recently received a Rhode Island Monthly Best of Rhode Island Award for its SensAbilities Saturdays all-ability program.

 

About the Rhode Island Historical Society

Founded in 1822, the RIHS, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is the fourth-oldest historical society in the United States and is Rhode Island’s largest and oldest historical organization. In Providence, the RIHS owns and operates the John Brown House Museum, a designated National Historic Landmark, built in 1788; the Aldrich House, built in 1822 and used for administration and public programs; and the Mary Elizabeth Robinson Research Center, where archival, book and image collections are housed. In Woonsocket, the RIHS manages the Museum of Work and Culture, a community museum examining the industrial history of northern Rhode Island and of the workers and settlers, especially French-Canadians, who made it one of the state’s most distinctive areas.


    

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