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For Immediate Release                                                          Press Contact: Sarah Carr, (401) 769-9675 x2


What: Celebration of Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day at the Museum of Work & Culture

When: Saturday, June 24 [FREE]

Where: The Museum of Work & Culture, 42 S. Main St., Woonsocket

Museum of Work & Culture Observes Québec National Holiday With Free Films

(WOONSOCKET, R.I.) – The Museum of Work & Culture will be offering free film screenings of Quebecois films on Saturday, June 24, in honor of Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day, Québec’s National Holiday.

Screenings will be held throughout the day, with the first 10 visitors receiving Québec goodie bags.

The day’s schedule of films include:

10am: In Chasse-Galerie: La légende, set in 1863, a group of snowbound travelers invokes the devil, who gives them a flying canoe for them to go home. When one of them finds his wife about to die in labor, he makes a pact with the devil to save her and his newborn daughter Liza. He then cheats the devil of his prize by sacrificing himself. Twenty-five years later, Liza wants to marry her beloved Jos, but the devil is determined to ruin her happiness.

12pm: La passion d’Augustine tells the story of Mother Augustine, a nun at a small convent in rural Québec who provides a musical education to young women no matter their socioeconomic background. However, with the looming changes brought by Vatican II and Quebec's Quiet Revolution, the school's future is at peril.

2pm: In Henri Henri, a young man who was raised as an orphan by a group of nuns is thrown into the world when the convent is sold. He heeds the advice of the sisters and “follows the signs of destiny” to a job as a lamplighter. Through encounters with a bitter old businessman and a dreamy cashier, Henri changes people’s lives.

This event is made possible with the support of the Québec Delegation in Boston.

About the Museum of Work & Culture

The interactive and educational Museum of Work & Culture shares the stories of the men, women, and children who came to find a better life in Rhode Island’s mill towns in the late 19th- and 20th centuries. It recently received a Rhode Island Monthly Best of Rhode Island Award for its SensAbilities Saturdays all-ability program.

About the Rhode Island Historical Society

Founded in 1822, the RIHS, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is the fourth-oldest historical society in the United States and is Rhode Island’s largest and oldest historical organization. In Providence, the RIHS owns and operates the John Brown House Museum, a designated National Historic Landmark, built in 1788; the Aldrich House, built in 1822 and used for administration and public programs; and the Mary Elizabeth Robinson Research Center, where archival, book and image collections are housed. In Woonsocket, the RIHS manages the Museum of Work and Culture, a community museum examining the industrial history of northern Rhode Island and of the workers and settlers, especially French-Canadians, who made it one of the state’s most distinctive areas.

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